The Farsider

June 25, 2015 

Bill Mattos, Editor and Publisher <bilmat@comcast.net>
Leroy Pyle, Webmaster <leroypyle@sjpba.net> 

The Farsider is an independent publication that is not affiliated with the San Jose Police Benevolent
Assn. The SJPBA has allowed the Farsider to be included on its web site solely for the convenience
of the retired San Jose Police community. The content of this newsletter does not represent or reflect
the views of the San Jose Police Benevolent Association's Board of Directors or its membership.


 

CELEBRATION OF LIFE FOR JOE BROCKMAN IS TOMORROW (FRI. THE 26th)
 

Dave Delgado asked us to remind those of you who plan on attending tomorrow’s 3:00 p.m. Celebration of Life for Joe that parking at the POA could be difficult because it’s a workday in the complex. While the POA has been good about letting its neighbors know about events such as this, those attending should expect to spend a little extra time finding a parking space.

 

POA UPDATES



June 23rd

KPIX 5 News: San Jose Needs More Police, Not Consultants

Click HERE to watch the video.



~ ~ ~ 

Mercury News: San Jose Police Look to Outside Help to Redesign Force in Lean Staffing Times.

—Department hires outside consultant to help map out future— 

By Robert Salonga <rsalonga@mercurynews.com>
Mercury News — June 23, 2015

SAN JOSE — The state of the San Jose Police Department could be likened to a car buyer trying to save money by buying a replacement with better gas mileage.

The storied police force, once boasting the utility and power of a pickup truck, is looking to reinvent itself as a compact hybrid.

Depleted staffing has prompted police brass to make the unprecedented move of seeking an outside consultant to help the department essentially redesign how the city will be policed moving forward, re-evaluating where and how officers are deployed.

Much of the reworking has been spurred by two main factors: a precipitous decrease in officers since 2008 that has thinned the ranks by a third, to about 960 officers as of last week; and contorting to fulfill a policing model predicated on having its historic peak of 1,400 officers. The department is currently authorized to employ 1,109.

SJPD has not fielded fewer than a thousand officers since the mid-1980s, when the city was about 30 percent smaller than its current population of about 1 million. By contrast, San Francisco employs more than 2,000 officers for a city of roughly 850,000 residents.

“We are definitely in a crisis about our staffing, no doubt about that,” administrative Deputy Chief Phan Ngo said. “We’re in uncharted waters. We want to see how we can do things differently.”

In the meantime, the department has already made sweeping changes in the way it operates, cannibalizing detective and specialized divisions — such as burglary and traffic enforcement — to buoy street patrols, which are the highest priority. For some issues, such as property crimes, the change has had the effect of a snake eating its own tail; fewer investigative units means fewer preventable crime trends are identified, leaving patrol officers to scramble more and more to keep up.

As a result, officers are routinely working extra hours, with some told at the end of their shifts that they are being “held over” on overtime because no relief is immediately available. A growing number of officers have chosen to leave rather than continue through what they now see as a meat grinder.

“They’re so tired and worn out from working six-day weeks for months. They don’t get to see their families,” said a 20-year veteran officer who asked not to be named for fear of reprisal. “I’m not willing to do that anymore. I can keep damaging my personal relationships, or I can be on a 40-hour schedule, and I can have a life.”

Police leaders such as Ngo know the pressure that officers face, and that there is little help coming in the near future: The past two police academies and an upcoming class have each numbered fewer than 20 cadets, which doesn’t offset even the 79 officers who have resigned or retired this year. At least 100 officers have left the department each year for the past three years.

“We want to make sure we take care of our people. We know this pace is not sustainable,” Ngo said. “We’re constantly taking bodies from elsewhere in the Police Department to backfill patrol. And we know that’s not a good model, for a host of reasons, especially instability. We just can’t have a model where every six months we have to continue to look and cut and redeploy.”

Once a consultant is chosen after a months-long search, police leaders say the department’s customary ways of doing things, from how it sets priorities on investigations to how it draws police districts — untouched since the mid-1990s — are fair game.

“There’s no sacred cow. Everything’s on the table, and we’re open to recommendations,” Ngo said. “We’re looking for ways to realistically staff our Police Department. We know we do a lot of things well when it comes to major crimes, but it’s the other things that we can do much better in, like property crimes, even simple assaults. We don’t have the staff to do the job that we would like to do.”

The scrutiny over police practices are thought by some to be overdue anyway. Ngo said the idea of hiring a consultant dovetails with much-needed innovation. Through the staffing struggles, the department has pushed through several initiatives, from a plan to introduce body-worn cameras and upgrade mobile computer terminals and crime-analytics software, to an examination of how the department evaluates racial bias allegations and internal complaints about officers.

“This is an opportunity for us. There’s plenty of challenge in this, but I’m confident, as challenging as it has been, we’ll look back and say this was a great turning point,” Mayor Sam Liccardo said. “While we’re working on rebuilding our police, we’re taking this opportunity to make sure this is the most efficient, innovative, effective department in the country given its limited staff.”

Meanwhile, the city and police union continue talks to work out a competitive wage to reduce the number of officers leaving for other Bay Area agencies, and to find a solution to an ongoing conflict over pension and disability reform that has led to dueling lawsuits. For the union, there’s no time to waste: With every passing week, experienced officers and commanders are heading or looking outward along with decades of institutional knowledge, increasing the degree of difficulty with restoring the force.

“We’re in big, big trouble if (other police agencies) are taking our best people,” said Officer James Gonzales, vice president of the San Jose Police Officers’ Association. “I’m worried that if even if we have a resolution, what will we be left with?”

Gonzales is pushing for resolution on both issues before the council goes on its summer break starting July 1. That might be a tall order given the city’s negotiations with other city employee unions that have more imminent contract expirations. Liccardo called it a matter of “bandwidth” but pledged to work through the summer, if necessary.

“I’m telling my colleagues we’re going to need them to be available during the July break to discuss any issues that might hinder our settlement with the police union,” Liccardo said.

Councilman Raul Peralez, an SJPD officer until his election last fall, said the urgency can’t be stressed enough.

“We’re not yet in a place where officers feel they can stop looking for another job in the city,” Peralez said. “Every day does count. We know we’re under the gun.”

 

PENSION NEWS



June 18th

Measure B and MOA Member Update

Today, the POA and Local 230 met with the City Manager and his team to further discuss a settlement of the Measure B litigation. At this meeting we informed the City Manager that on July 15, 2015 the 6th.

District Court of Appeals will be in possession of the Measure B trial court records and the clock will begin for filing of the first legal briefs in the appeals process.

The sense of urgency to conclude settlement talks has been heightened by the start of the appeals process beginning on July 15th. We also informed the City Manager and his team that as of today, 75 SJ police officers have left the force since January 1, 2015 with more leaving each week.

The City informed us that a special closed session has been scheduled for Friday June 26, 2015 focused solely on Measure B settlement talks. We have expressed to the City the dire consequences of inaction on settling the Measure B litigation. If the city council decides to take its summer vacation without fixing this mess it sends the wrong message to our members who are being required to work mandatory overtime, having vacation denied, and being worked to the bone because of inadequate staffing.

Also, as of today, the POA has not received a written wage proposal from the city. We have informed the city that we will no longer meet over any other MOA issues unless and until we receive a wage proposal and that there will be no settlement of Measure B without a competitive wage proposal for the membership to consider as well.

The below article will run in tomorrow's Mercury News and it is a must read. We will keep you informed as events develop.

Pres. Paul Kelly and VP James Gonzales

~ ~ ~ 
 

San Jose Police Union Urges City Leaders to Act Before July Recess

By Ramona Giwargis <rgiwargis@mercurynews.com>
Mercury News — June 19, 2015

SAN JOSE -- With the mending economy bringing more revenue for raises, city officials have reached agreements with employee unions representing most of San Jose's 5,200 workers that will restore some of the pay that was cut during the recession.

But one big deal remains elusive: a labor agreement with the city's 1,000 police officers.

Though talks continue, and the officers, unlike other workers, have six months before their contract expires, San Jose's police union said more resignations will come from the depleted force that once numbered 1,400 cops if city leaders don't reach a deal on pay and benefits before the City Council's July break.



San Jose police officers at a 2009 ceremony.

"If they leave without addressing the wage agreements," said Tom Saggau, a spokesman for the San Jose Police Officers' Association, "it will be a catastrophe. They will be sending a message that sun-tanning and water sports are more important than fixing the mess that many of them created."

Police and other city unions agreed to 10 percent pay cuts in 2010 as revenues sagged during the recession and the costs of retirement benefits that were boosted during the last decade soared. Even with the pay cuts, the city had to eliminate hundreds of jobs, including its first-ever police layoffs, to close record budget shortfalls. And in 2012, city leaders won voter approval of Measure B to scale back pensions.
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City unions have fought the pension measure in court, though provisions eliminating bonus pension checks for retirees and offering smaller pensions to new hires remain in place. Mayor Sam Liccardo early this year offered to seek a legal settlement, but he said this week that any settlement on pensions could be "weeks or months" away.

Since the 10 percent pay cuts, the police officers have received about 7 percent pay increases, with another 3 percent coming next month. Other city unions got increases totaling 5.5 percent.

The other labor agreements signed this month offer 3 percent raises over the next two or three years.

James Gonzales, the police union's vice president, said they are waiting for the city to make a wage proposal before making any counter-offer. But Gonzales said departures indicate the city's current compensation isn't competitive: 75 officers have left or retired since January, including 10 in the last two weeks. It puts a strain on current officers, he said, who are forced to work overtime, cancel vacations and cover shifts on their days off.

"It sends the wrong message for an exhausted workforce to have to forgo their vacations to see council members go on vacation when a resolution is possible if they stay," Gonzales said, adding that last weekend's shift was short by 30 officers.

Councilman Raul Peralez, a former police officer, said the council shouldn't take its July recess until labor negotiations with police are finished. Peralez worried that delaying discussions for another month could lead to more officers leaving San Jose.

"We are bleeding employees right now, so every day we take to come to an agreement, we're going to lose more officers," Peralez said. "A lot of officers are holding their breath, waiting for us to make them an offer. They can only hold their breath for so long."

While union officials couldn't say with certainty how many officers might leave if an agreement isn't reached by June 30, Gonzales said dozens are testing with other law enforcement agencies, which typically ramp up hiring during the summer.

"We could lose another 50 to 60 people by the end of the year," he said.

Vice Mayor Rose Herrera said she's open to continuing labor discussions in July, especially given how close the city is to reaching a resolution with the police union. The City Council also will schedule more closed-session meetings this month, she said.

"Everyone is committed to working on this to get it done," Herrera said. "We all have our cellphones (in July) and we can call meetings, if needed."

~ ~ ~
 

Click HERE and scroll down to review readers’ comments regarding this article. Some are critical of the SJPD and some are supportive.

 

THE TRIALS & TRIBULATIONS OF SAN JOSE AND THE SJPD

And the beat goes on (pardon the pun) thanks mostly to forced overtime…

Cop Union: City Must Act

—Leadership warns of officer exodus if deal isn’t reached by July—

By Ramona Giwargis <rgiwargis@mercurynews.com>
Mercury News — June 19, 2015

SAN JOSE — With the mending economy bringing more revenue for raises, city officials have reached agreements with employee unions representing most of San Jose’s 5,200 workers that will restore some of the pay that was cut during the recession.

But one big deal remains elusive: a labor agreement with the city’s 1,000 police officers.

Though talks continue, and the officers, unlike other workers, have six months before their contract expires, San Jose’s police union said more resignations will come from the depleted force that once numbered 1,400 cops if city leaders don’t reach a deal on pay and benefits before the City Council’s July break.

“If they leave without addressing the wage agreements,” said Tom Saggau, a spokesman for the San Jose Police Officers’ Association, “it will be a catastrophe. They will be sending a message that sun-tanning and water sports are more important than fixing the mess that many of them created.”

Police and other city unions agreed to 10 percent pay cuts in 2010 as revenues sagged during the recession and the costs of retirement benefits that were boosted during the previous decade soared. Even with the pay cuts, the city had to eliminate hundreds of jobs, including its first-ever police layoffs, to close record budget shortfalls. And in 2012, city leaders won voter approval of Measure B to scale back pensions.

City unions have fought the pension measure in court, though provisions eliminating bonus pension checks for retirees and offering smaller pensions to new hires remain in place. Mayor Sam Liccardo early this year offered to seek a legal settlement, but he said this week that any settlement on pensions could be “weeks or months” away.

Since the 10 percent pay cuts, the police officers have received about 7 percent pay increases, with another 3 percent coming next month. Other city unions got increases totaling 5.5 percent.

The other labor agreements signed this month offer 3 percent raises over the next two or three years.

James Gonzales, the police union’s vice president, said they are waiting for the city to make a wage proposal before making any counter-offer. But Gonzales said departures indicate the city’s current compensation isn’t competitive: 75 officers have left or retired since January, including 10 in the last two weeks. It puts a strain on current officers, he said, who are forced to work overtime, cancel vacations and cover shifts on their days off.

“It sends the wrong message for an exhausted workforce to have to forgo their vacations to see council members go on vacation when a resolution is possible if they stay,” Gonzales said, adding that last weekend’s shift was short by 30 officers.

Councilman Raul Peralez, a former police officer, said the council shouldn’t take its July recess until labor negotiations with police are finished. Peralez worried that delaying discussions for another month could lead to more officers leaving San Jose.

“We are bleeding employees right now, so every day we take to come to an agreement, we’re going to lose more officers,” Peralez said. “A lot of officers are holding their breath, waiting for us to make them an offer. They can only hold their breath for so long.”

While union officials couldn’t say with certainty how many officers might leave if an agreement isn’t reached by June 30, Gonzales said dozens are testing with other law enforcement agencies, which typically ramp up hiring during the summer.

“We could lose another 50 to 60 people by the end of the year,” he said.

Vice Mayor Rose Herrera said she’s open to continuing labor discussions in July, especially given how close the city is to reaching a resolution with the police union. The City Council also will schedule more closed-session meetings this month, she said.

“Everyone is committed to working on this to get it done,” Herrera said. “We all have our cellphones (in July) and we can call meetings, if needed.”
 

• • • • •


The POA’s choice to fill the District 4 seat on the City Council came up short, but there may be a bright spot in that the winner says SJPD should have 2,000 officers. The story below is from today’s paper…

Nguyen Could Be Swing Vote

—New councilman sees rebuilding the beleaguered police force as top priority—

By Ramona Giwargis <rgiwargis@mercurynews.com>
Mercury News — June 25, 2015

SAN JOSE — After winning a hard-fought City Council race, Manh Nguyen’s real work begins as the city grapples with some of the biggest issues to face San Jose in recent years.

While Nguyen captured a comfortable majority of the votes Tuesday, the San Jose City Council voted on its priorities for next year with wage theft, potential expansion of a rent control law and establishing local hiring incentives making the top three.

And, though Nguyen will be just one voice on the council, his vote could be the deciding factor on issues involving economic development, affordable housing and public safety.

Nguyen, the owner of a Vietnamese-language media company, squared off with opponent Tim Orozco, a legislative aide.

 

New City Councilman Manh Nguyen won the District 4
seat Tuesday with the support of business interests.

With 95 percent of the ballots counted as of Wednesday evening, Nguyen held on to his insurmountable lead with 56.2 percent of the vote.

Nguyen didn’t gain the endorsement of police, but he said rebuilding San Jose’s thinning department will be a top priority when he takes office in August.

“For a city of more than a million residents, we have only 900 officers — that is unacceptable,” Nguyen said, adding that the force should have 2,000 officers. Reaching an agreement on wages and pension benefits under Measure B is the first step, he said.

The City Council on Tuesday approved labor agreements with 10 of its 11 unions that included raises. The San Jose Police Officers’ Association is the only union still in negotiations, but its contract ends in December.

Nguyen said he also wants to see some changes to the police academy, including a provision that requires graduates to work in San Jose for several years or reimburse the city for training costs. “They cannot graduate then move to another city,” he said.

The council’s second-highest priority, exploring a proposal to expand rent control and tenant protections, will be another key vote for Nguyen. Although the majority of council members agree that something needs to be done to address San Jose’s “affordable housing crisis,” not all agree that rent control is the answer.

The city established an impact fee for affordable housing, but it’s too soon for officials to know if it’s working. A proposal to create a similar impact fee for commercial development was discussed but support for the idea was split. Only five council members voted to make it a priority next year.

In that case, Nguyen’s vote could have swayed the decision one way or another. Nguyen said he would not support another fee for commercial development because it would make it more difficult for new businesses to open in San Jose.

“We have to make it easier, not harder, for businesses,” Nguyen said, adding that he would support a local hiring incentive, which was ranked as the council’s third-highest priority.

Mayor Sam Liccardo, who supported Nguyen during the campaign, said he believes Nguyen will bring intelligence and a heart for the community to the dais. Although business and labor interests spent heavily to influence the race — business for Nguyen and labor for Orozco — the mayor dismissed the notion that Nguyen’s election will tip the power scales in one direction.

Liccardo said the political tug of war between business and labor was a thing of the past, and the new council is more collaborative and votes independently on issues.

“I think the council has been working pretty well together, and I don’t see any seismic shift from this election,” Liccardo said. “I expect that Manh will also be independent and do what’s best for the city.”


 

MAIL CALL



June 22nd

Bill,

This might interest some folks:

Don
(Hale) <samhaleceo@pacbell.net>

~ ~ ~

Dear Korean War Veterans, Donors, and Friends,

You are cordially invited to join us in celebration at the Korean War Memorial Groundbreaking Ceremony, 10:00 to 11:30 am, Saturday, July 11, 2015 in the Presidio of San Francisco.

Please see the attached invitation for full details, including the program and a map showing the location of the Memorial site and nearby parking.

If you are able to accept this invitation, please RSVP to:

Eleanor Zapanta
Phone: (415) 921-1933
Email: <eleanor@kwmf.org>

Click HERE to view the invitation.

We look forward to seeing you on July 11 for this meaningful Groundbreaking Ceremony.

Gerard Parker, Executive Director
Korean War Memorial Foundation
 

A STAR HAS RISEN

Granted, Megyn Kelly is not every Fox News’ viewers’ favorite on-air personality, but you can’t deny that she has developed a huge following. Those of you who are fans may be interested in the following. And if you are, there’s a link at the bottom that will take you to the full interview in Variety…

Syracuse Native Megyn Kelly Lands Variety Magazine Cover: “I’m an independent” 

Syracuse native and Syracuse University alumna Megyn Kelly continues to be a journalism juggernaut for Fox News, and she's doing it by forging her own path.

The 44-year-old host of "The Kelly File" appears on the cover of Variety magazine as "the new star of Fox News," and deservedly so. She started hosting her own primetime talk show in 2013 and, less than a year later, started beating fellow Fox News host Bill O'Reilly some nights in the 25-54 ratings demographic and nipping at his heels in the overall audience with an average of more than 2 million total viewers.

But while her cable news network has earned a reputation for its political viewpoints, Kelly tells the June 2015 issue she's not a conservative -- or a liberal.

"I have voted for both Democrats and Republicans," she said. "I'm an independent."

Kelly added that, by "not rooting for anybody," she feels she can be a more impartial reporter. She's done tough interviews with 2016 GOP candidates Rand Paul and Jeb Bush, plus famously questioned Karl Rove for arguing Barack Obama hadn't won Ohio in the 2012 presidential election. She also told Variety she "respects Hillary Clinton" and would be "fair" to Democrats.



Megyn Kelly attends The 35 Most Powerful People in Media
hosted by The Hollywood Reporter at The Four Seasons
Restaurant on Wednesday, April 8, 2015, in New York.

"I don't feel passionately about politics," she told the magazine. "Is it easy for me to get fired up about someone's position on climate change? No, it's not. On most of these issues, I can see both sides."

Kelly was born in Syracuse and attended Tecumseh Elementary School in the Jamesville-DeWitt school district. When she was nine years old, her family moved to the Albany area, but she later returned to Central New York to pursue a career in broadcast journalism at SU.

She told Variety her parents helped shape her sense of humor. Her father died of a heart attack just before Christmas when she was 15, and when her mother went back to work as a nurse she broke down in tears in a meeting with doctors she was supervising.

"Even in that moment, she looked at the doctors and said: 'These tears are not for you. These tears are for my husband.' That's my role model," Kelly said.

Click HERE to read the full interview at Variety.com.

 

THE BEST OF THE LATE NITE JOKES

June 17—23

June 17: Donald Trump announced that he’s running for president. During his speech he told the crowd that if elected he would be “the greatest jobs president that God ever created.” Then God said, "Hey, don't drag me into this publicity stunt."

Donald Trump told ABC news that if he had Oprah as a running mate, they could easily win. Although you know who’d definitely win? Oprah without Donald Trump.

Congrats to the Golden State Warriors, who beat the Cleveland Cavaliers to win the NBA championship. But it was a little awkward. Mark Jackson, who was fired as the Warriors' coach last season, was one of the broadcasters for ABC. That is basically the sports equivalent of the bride’s ex giving a wedding toast.

June 18: I want to remind everyone that there are just three days left until Father’s Day. But more importantly, there are 324 days left until the next Mother’s Day.

Hillary Clinton signed a note this week for a nine-year-old boy, explaining to his teacher that he was missing school to meet her. In exchange, the kid wrote Hillary a note saying his dog ate her emails.

The Obama administration announced that a woman will replace Alexander Hamilton on the $10 bill starting in 2020. I want to be the first person to congratulate Caitlyn Hamilton.

June 19: In an interview yesterday, Donald Trump called Jeb Bush a reluctant warrior and said he thinks Jeb is an unhappy person. Which is interesting coming from a guy who always looks like he just ate a lemon.

Red Sox third baseman Pablo Sandoval was forced to sit out last night after he was caught “liking” pictures of women on Instagram during a game. The team actually benched him. Even worse, when he got home, his girlfriend couched him.

This weekend people in Japan can start purchasing “Pepper,” which is a four-foot-tall robot that can keep you company and guess your mood. Though, if you just bought a robot to keep you company, how hard can it be to guess your mood? Lonely.

There are reports that Amazon may be able to launch its drone delivery program within the next year. So if you hear your doorbell and see a robot hovering near your house, it could be the end of the world . . . or, the 12-pack of Brita filters you ordered.

June 22: I'm your host, Jimmy Fallon. And according to a mug I got yesterday, I'm also "The World's Greatest Dad!"

On Saturday, the Washington Nationals’ Max Scherzer pitched a no-hitter against the Pittsburgh Pirates. He said it was his Father’s Day gift to his dad. Then his brother said, “Uh, can you put my name on that too? I got him a mug.”

Now that President Obama has 19 months left, media outlets are speculating about what his legacy will be. Some think it could be healthcare, or the trade deal. “Yeah, what could it be?" said the first black president, Barack Obama.

Congrats to 21-year-old Jordan Spieth, who won golf’s U.S. Open yesterday. You can tell he's young because he's never heard of any of the products they advertise during golf tournaments.

June 23: With Greece on the brink of defaulting on its bailouts, it's rumored that it may consider asking Vladimir Putin for a loan. Even the Devil said, “Don't do it! Don't mess with that guy.”

There are reports that North Korea has begun blocking people from using Instagram. Which is ironic, since the whole country is basically one big Throwback Thursday.

Next month Amazon will start paying authors in its Kindle library by the number of pages people read instead of how many times their book is checked out. That's great news for Amazon but not so great news for someone who, say, just wrote a kids' book that's only 15 pages long.

According to a new study, 88 percent of Facebook users have admitted to spending some time looking at their ex’s profile. While the other 12 percent have admitted to spending ALL of their time looking at their ex's profile.

June 17: In his presidential announcement speech yesterday, Donald Trump pledged to become "the greatest jobs president that God ever created." This is from the man who coined the catch phrase "You're fired."

Political analysts are saying that as a candidate, Donald Trump is "a totally unqualified nuisance." In other words, he is a legitimate contender for the Republican nomination.

For the first time in 140 years, a black bear was spotted in Indiana. When questioned, the bear said, “Actually, I just identify as black.”

Yesterday Rachel Dolezal, the white NAACP leader who said she is black, claimed there's no biological proof that she's white. However, today that was disproven by scientists who found wine cooler in her bloodstream.

June 18: At his campaign launch, Donald Trump apparently paid extras $50 to cheer for him at the rally. Trump said, "Usually when I pay a person to like me, it's my wife."

The FDA has ruled that trans fat, the main ingredient in junk food, has to be off the shelves within three years. Just as they're legalizing marijuana they're destroying junk food. Do one or do the other. You can't do them both.

June 22: Yesterday on Father’s Day my kids gave me breakfast in bed, which I thought was sweet. My nine-year-old makes a mean mojito. Brought me a cigarette too. Rolled it himself.

On a podcast the other day, President Obama used the N-word. In a related story, his new rap album drops on Wednesday.

Newly leaked emails from Sony Pictures show there was an agreement between executives to keep Spider-Man white and straight. However, in order to please the gay community "The Fantastic Four" will now be "The Fabulous Four."

Fourteen paintings by Adolf Hitler were sold at auction in Germany. After the auction the surprised buyer said, "Wait a second, it's THAT Adolf Hitler?"

June 23: South Carolina and Mississippi are on the verge of taking down their state Capitol's Confederate flag. Here's the surprising part. They're doing it just because Taylor Swift told them to.

Amazon announced it's discontinuing products with the Confederate flag. They won't sell it. So now Amazon no longer has to use the phrase "You may also like slavery."

Chevrolet put out a press release about its newest car written only in emojis. Ford did the same. Unfortunately the emojis were a lemon and a tow truck.

Scientists believe the first modern Europeans mated with Neanderthals. This is the oldest evidence yet of beer goggles.

June 18: According to The New York Times, one of the biggest doping scandals in the history of track and field is coming to light. It involves Russian athletes in the sport of race-walking — or as it's known to the billions of people who do it every day, "hurrying up."

I believe you should always play by the rules. But I understand why there might be cheating in a sport where the rules are, "Go as fast as you can, except don't."

You need just the right drugs for race-walking. What do you tell your dealer? "Yeah, man, just a half-dose. That stuff you gave me last time was really strong. It nearly made me break into a jog."

It's a bad sign if you can't distinguish between a sport and a group of people rushing to the bathroom. Doping for race-walking is like robbing a bank that you know has only $2 in it.

June 17: Donald Trump is running for president, and I couldn't be happier about it. He promised he would be "the greatest jobs president that God ever created." I think President Trump would be a very good thing for jobs in this country — specifically for my job here at this show.

Last night the Golden State Warriors beat the Cleveland Cavaliers to win their first NBA title in 40 years. Andre Iguodala of the Warriors was named the MVP, which is great news for everyone except whoever has to engrave that name on a trophy.

It was a devastating loss for Cavs superstar LeBron James. He lost both the NBA Finals and 40 percent of his hairline. It's times like these when it really helps that you make $65 million a year.

In England, the world's oldest bride and groom tied the knot. She's 91, he's 103. Men are unbelievable. He couldn't find someone his own age? They're the world's oldest newlyweds, but I like to think of them as the world's newest oldlyweds.

June 18: Donald Trump is running for president, which so far is everything I could have hoped for and more. He made his announcement in front of a packed crowd of supporters. But according to The Hollywood Reporter, his camp hired actors to go and then hold up signs and cheer for him. Well, Trump did say he was going to create jobs.

Trump's people deny these allegations. But the casting agency that supposedly sent out the job listing refused to comment. I don't blame Trump. It's embarrassing. It's the political equivalent of paying kids to come to your birthday party.

Father's Day is three days away. That’s the day you call your father and talk to him for four seconds and then he hands the phone to your mother.

The world's oldest person has died. Again. Third time this year. Someone is killing the world's oldest people and we do nothing about it.

June 22:  I hope everyone who deserved it had a good Father's Day. Kids will buy cards and T-shirts and even little trophies that say their father is the best dad in the world. But the fact of the matter is that simple math tells us the vast majority of these kids are lying.

You have to wish a happy Father's Day to every dad you know. I got Father's Day text messages from 47 people. I know at least 500 fathers. For me to send 500 texts I would have to start working on this the day after Valentine's Day.

From now on I will exchange Father's Day greetings only with people who have seen me in my underpants. And in person too. If you've seen me in my underpants on TV, that doesn't count.

NBA playoff MVP Andre Iguodala is here tonight. For Father's Day his son made a replica of the championship trophy for him. He made a sculpture and waited until Father's Day. My son didn't sculpt me anything, but then I didn't win an NBA championship.

June 17: Presidential hopeful Donald Trump said yesterday that he has better hair than Senator Marco Rubio — a claim that was recently disproven by wind.

A new study suggests that marriage is more beneficial for men than women. The results of the study were shouted at me through a locked bedroom door.

Emerson College officials said that starting in 2016 they will offer students the opportunity to major in comedy. Or, you can just take your tuition money and burn it in front of your parents.

June 18: According to a new poll, 58 percent of New Jersey residents support legalizing marijuana. I think they just want to finally have a good answer to the question, “What’s that smell?”

It was announced today that printed physical copies of Wikipedia will soon be available for sale. Of course I’m not sure that’s true because I read it on Wikipedia.

June 22: President Obama this weekend used the N-word when speaking about race relations in America. Which explains why everyone at Fox News today kept shouting, “And I quote …”

A Pennsylvania brewery said that it is introducing a new beer to honor the late Penn State football coach, Joe Paterno. And if you give some to a minor, authorities will look the other way.

June 23: NASCAR released a statement today calling for the removal of the Confederate flag from the South Carolina capitol. Released a statement? They should have sent a pit crew. That thing would be down in under nine seconds.

Johnny Depp's private village in the south of France is on the market for nearly $26 million. So he must be living somewhere else because nothing with Johnny Depp in it has made $26 million in years.

Lambeau Field in Wisconsin set a new record for ejections after nearly 300 fans were kicked out of a Kenny Chesney concert for fighting, harassment, and extreme intoxication — which is also the title of the song he was playing at the time.

General Mills announced that it will phase out all official flavors and colors from its cereals by 2017. The bad news is that now Cheerios and Fruit Loops will look exactly the same.


 

WEEKLY SNOPES URBAN LEGEND UPDATE



Click HERE for the latest update.


 

 


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Should the police be disarmed? Media Analyst Mark Dice has produced several videos where he asks people on the street if they would sign a petition for ridiculous things. In his latest video that was posted on YouTube earlier this week, he’s asking people to sign a petition to disarm the police. What’s a little surprising is how many people actually signed the fake petition. Or maybe it’s not all that surprising with what’s been reported by the mainstream media. Or it could be that people in general hate to say "No" to someone gathering signatures on a petition. Have a LOOK a form your own opinion. (3:36)




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If THIS lucky dog could talk, what would you like to bet that he would say, “All I need is my Teddy and I’m good to go.” (0:36)




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I am SO grateful to THIS lady in red who is letting it all hang out at a wedding reception. Thanks to her, I will never ever feel self-conscious on those rare occasions when I take to the dance floor. (1:06)




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From France comes THIS rare comedy trapeze act received from Stan Miller. It’s one you don’t see every day and is certainly worth a look. (8:39)




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Is there no end to the talent that can be found in France? What makes this Paris shopping mall flash mob received from Chuck Blackmore so unique is that it’s comprised solely of children. If you don’t enjoy THESE young music-makers it may mean you don’t have a soul. (3:33)




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When it comes to flash mobs, let’s not overlook the Vietnamese Rhapsody Philharmonic. Click on THIS link and watch it form from the beginning. Perhaps it’s a cultural thing, but there is a noticeable lack of applause after the rousing musical presentation. (6:50)




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“Eyes on the Road” is a creative ad from Volkswagen to help people understand how quickly a car crash can occur when using a mobile device while driving. Perhaps it should be SEEN by everyone who has a proclivity to text and drive. (1:23)




• • • • •
 

Would both counselors please approach the bench… 

Lawyers should never ask a grandma a question if they aren't prepared for the answer.

In a trial, a Southern small-town prosecuting attorney called his first witness, an elderly grandmother to the stand. He approached her and asked, “Mrs. Jones, do you know me?”

She responded, “Why, yes, I do know you, Mr. Williams. I've known you since you were a boy, and frankly, you've been a big disappointment to me. You lie, you cheat on your wife, and you manipulate people and talk about them behind their backs. You think you're a big shot when you haven't the brains to realize you'll never amount to anything more than a two-bit paper pusher. Yes, I know you.”

The lawyer was stunned. Not knowing what else to do, he pointed across the room and asked, “Mrs. Jones, do you know the defense attorney?”

She again replied, “Why yes, I do. I've known Mr. Bradley since he was a youngster, too. He's lazy, bigoted, and he has a drinking problem. He can't build a normal relationship with anyone, and his law practice is one of the worst in the entire state. Not to mention he cheated on his wife with three different women. One of them was your wife. Yes, I know him.”

The defense attorney was so embarrassed that he wanted to crawl under the table and hide.

The judge asked both counselors to approach the bench and, in a very quiet voice, said, “If either of you idiots asks her if she knows me, I'll find both of you in contempt and sentence you to jail for the next 12 months.”
 

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Want to see something as spiritual as it is spooky? Those of you who are longtime subscribers may recall that this appeared in the Farsider several years ago. We were reminded of it as a result of a similar Facebook posting; similar but far different.

Concentrate on the 4 dots in the middle of the picture for 30 seconds. Then look at a blank wall or a blank sheet of white paper and start blinking your eyes. You will see a circle of light. Continue looking at that circle. Do you recognize the individual? If you do, you will understand why we described it as spooky as it is “spiritual.” One might say it's akin to finding the same image on a tortilla or a grilled cheese sandwich.
 

• • • • •
 

This short clip shows “Dude” the Chihuahua horsing around with “Maggie” the English Mastiff. Have a LOOK at the 39-second clip.


Now watch the same clip that Jimmy Kimmel presented on his show, but with the addition of some video MAGIC. (0:47)

 


• • • • •


Here’s an example of a corporate video advertisement made for the Internet as opposed to television. THIS one from Home Depot has been getting lots of air time. (1:08)




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For you fans of Major League Baseball, is this a cheap shot? We report, you decide.



The Dodgers last won the World Series 27 years ago (1988).


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Remember that ending scene in "Indiana Jones" where the Ark of the Covenant is boxed up and wheeled through an endless government warehouse? Would you be surprised to learn that a place like that actually exists? Stan Miller calls THIS site very interesting and we fully agree. Take a look “Inside the Army’s Spectacular Hidden Treasure Room” if we have piqued your curiosity. (Note that the site may take a moment or two to load.)




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Can you believe we made it? After watching THIS video from a few years ago, we are the first to admit that it is, in fact, hard to believe. (2:11)




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Art lovers should enjoy THIS clip from Alice Murphy. It highlights the artistic talent of a young lady who uses her hands as her brush to create what she calls “The Time of Harvest.” (3:54)




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Imagine a building so large that it houses a HUGE shopping mall with 150 stores, a hotel, and a beach with a 1,000 foot long shoreline adjacent to an LED screen that is 450 feet wide and taller than the Statute of Liberty. It seems that if the Chinese can imagine it, they can build it. Check out this "CBS This Morning" clip received from Chuck Blackmore. (2:57)




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This week’s video for you gear heads (a/k/a motor freaks) was sent in by Bruce Morton. If your ride still uses a carburetor as opposed to fuel injection, you will definitely want to watch THIS and take notes. (2:28)




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Bert Kelsey provided us with some additional fodder for you gear heads in the form of THIS "Jay Leno's Garage" video about his astonishing 1948 Buick Super Convertible. If you know what the term “Dynaflow” was in reference to back in the day, you may be interested in watching this. (18:47)




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Lumpy calls THIS Visa ad “clever and funny,” and we agree. We don’t recall ever having seen it despite the fact that it is five years old. (0:59)




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This QUIZ will reportedly tell you which of the presidential candidates’ views pictured below mostly coincide with your own. At the time the quiz was created, these were the only candidates who had announced their intentions of running for president.

If you choose to take the quiz, consider clicking the “Other stances” button for more specific answers on each question as opposed to just the two above. At the conclusion you will receive a graphic like the one below…

 

• • • • •



Meet 4-year-old Lea, who’s about to take her very first aerobatic FLIGHT with her French-Canadian pop at the controls. (3:47)




• • • • •


For our closer this week we’re reprising the “Grand Rapids LipDub” video which, in our opinion, is the finest one of its kind ever produced. It first appeared in the Farsider a week after it was filmed 2011 and included a cast of 5,000 people that involved a major shutdown of downtown Grand Rapids which was filled with marching bands, parades, a wedding, motorcades and a host of other features. If you have seen it before, we think you will enjoy it again. And if you have never seen it, you are in for a treat. Click HERE and the show will begin. (9:50)




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Pic of the Week 




THE FARSIDER SUBSCRIPTION ROSTER as of 6/25/15

Additions and changes since the last published update (alphabetical by last name):

Brian Daley — Added
John Mindermann — Added

To receive the email address of anyone on the list -- or to receive the roster with all of the email addresses -- send your request to <bilmat@comcast.net>.

Abram, Fred & Connie
Adams, Gene
Ady, Bruce
Agerbeek, Bob
Agerbeek, Rudy
Aguilar, David
Aguirre, Jim
Albericci, Jerry
Alberts, Dick
Alcantar, Ernie
Alfano, Phil
Alford, Mike
Aligo, Cynthia
Allbright, Bill
Allen, Bob
Alvarado, Marie
Alvarez, Pat (Campbell)
Amaral, Mike
Anders, Alberta
Anderson, Jim
Anderson, Mark
Anderson, Sharon
Anthony, Tom
Antoine, Steve
Antonowicz, Germaine
Appleby, Judy
Arata, Jennifer
Arca, Rich
Archie, Dan
Avery, Rod
Babineau, Dave & Cheryl
Bacigalupi, Dave
Baggott, Jim
Bailey, Rich
Baker, Beth
Balesano, Bob
Balesteri, Lou
Ballard, Gordon
Banner, Ken
Barikmo, Jon
Bariteau, John
Barnes, Steve
Barnett, Brad
Baroff, Stan
Barrera, Ray
Barranco, Rich
Barshay, Marc
Bartels, Don
Bartholomew, Dave
Bartoldo, Tom
Basilio, Les
Bastida, Maggie
Bates, Tom
Battaglia, Nick
Battaglia, Will
Baxter, Jack
Bayer, Lance
Bayers, Dennis
Beams, Bob
Beattie, George
Becerra, Manny
Beck, Brian
Beck, Tom
Becknall, Jim
Beckwith, Tony
Beiderman, Margie
Belcher, Steve
Bell, Bob
Bell, Mark
Bell, Mike
Belleci, Ron
Belveal, Chuck
Bence, Martin
Bennett, Joy
Bennett, Mark
Berggren, Heidi
Bergtholdt, Doug
Bernardo, Guy
Bettencourt, Ed
Bevis, Sherry
Biebel, Phil
Bielecki, Mike
Binder, Andrew
Biskup, Shelley
Blackmore, Chuck
Blackstock, Carroll
Boales, Tina
Boes, Judith
Boggess, Eileen
Boggess, Mike
Bonetti, Jon
Bosco, Al
Botar, Rick
Bowen, Gordy
Bowman, Mike
Boyd, Pat
Boyles, John
Bradshaw, Bob
Brahm, Bob
Bray, Mary Ellen
Brewer, Tom
Brickell, Dave
Bridgen, Dave
Brightwell, Larry
Brocato, Dom
Brookins, Dennis
Brooks, Bob
Brown Jr., Bill
Brown, Charlie
Brown, Dennis
Brown, Ernie
Brown, Terry
Browning, Bob
Brua, Dale
Bullock, April
Bullock, Dan
Bulygo, Corinne
Bulygo, Mary
Burns, Barbara
Burroughs, (Bronson) Utta
Busch, Dennis
Bye, Bud
Byers, Dave
Bytheway, Glenn
Caddell, Jim
Cadenasso, Richard
Caldarulo, Wendy
Calderon, Richard
Caldwell, Phyllis
Camara, Bob
Camarena, Raul
Campbell, Jason
Campbell, John
Campbell, Larry
Campos, John
Cannell, Tom
Caragher, Ed
Caraway, Steve
Card, Christine
Cardoza, Vic
Carlin, David
Carlsen, Laura
Carlton, Jim
Caro, Bert
Caro, Lynne
Carr Jr., John
Carr, John
Carraher, Don
Carraher, Jim
Carter, Ernie
Carrillo, Jaci Cordes
Carrillo, John
Cates, Dean
Cavallaro, Dave
Cedeno, Rey
Chalmers, JC
Chamness, Hank
Chapel, Ivan
Chevalier, Brian
Chavez, Ruben
Chewey, Bob
Christian, Brian
Christiansen, Bob
Christiansen, Rich
Christie, Kenn
Clark, Bill (the one who stayed)
Clark, Bill
Clayton, Dave
Clear, Jennifer
Clifton, Craig
Coates, Marisa
Cobarruviaz, Lou
Coen, Roger
Colombo, Tony
Comelli, Ivan
Como, John
Confer, Rick
Connor, Stephanie
Connors, Kim
Conrad, Mark
Contreras, Dolores
Conway, Ed
Cook, John
Cooke, Bertie
Coppom, Dave
Cordes, Marilyn
Cornfield, Scott
Cortez, Darrell
Costa, Mike
Cossey, Neil
Cotterall, Doug
Couser, Rich
Cripe, Rodger
Crowell, Chuck
Culwell, Ken
Cunningham, Stan
D'Arcy, Steve
Dailey, Karen
Daley, Brian
Daly, Ron
Damon, Alan
Damon, Veronica
Daniels, Jim
Daulton, Rich
Daulton, Zita
Davis, Bud
Davis, Joan
Davis, Mike
Davis, Rob
Day, Jack
Deaton, Caroll
DeBoard, Joe
DeGeorge, Bob
DeLaere, Sylvia
Delgado, Dave
DeMers, Buc
Dennis, Sandra
Destro, Mike
Destro, Tony
Devane, Dan
Devane, Joe
Dewey, Rod
Diaz, Mike
DiBari, Dave
DiVittorio, Gerrie
Dishman, Billy
Doherty, Janiece
Dolezal, Dennis
Dominguez, Bob
Dooley, Jeff
Dorsey, Ed
Dotzler, Jennifer
Dowdle, Mike
Doxie, Tara
Dudding, Bill
Dudley, Bruce
Duey, Dennis
Dye, Allen
Dwyer, Pat
Earnshaw, Kathy
Earnshaw, Patrick
Edillo-Brown, Margie
Edwards, Derrek
Edwards, Don
Egan, Mike
Eisenberg, Terry
Ellner, Howard
Ellsworth, Larry
Embry (Howsmon), Eva
Erfurth, Bill
Erickson, Rich
Esparza, Dave
Esparza, Fred
Estrabao, Dario
Eubanks, Earl
Evans, Ron
Ewing, Chris
Ewing, Don
Ewing, Paul
Fagalde, Kevin
Fair, Bruce
Fairhurst, Dick
Fanucchi, Ross
Farlow, Paul
Farmer, Jack
Faron, Walt
Farrow, Chuck
Faulstich, Marge
Faulwetter, Stan
Faz, Dennis
Fehr, Mike
Ferdinandsen, Ed
Ferguson, Betty
Ferguson, Ken
Ferla, Al
Fernsworth, Larry
Flauding, Ken
Fleming, Joe
Flores, Phil
Flosi, Ed
Fong, Richard
Fontanilla, Rick
Forbes, Jay
Foster, Rick
Foulkes [Duchon], Louise
Francois, Paul
Frazier, Rich
Freitas, Jordon
Fryslie, Kevin
Furnare, Claud
Gaines, Erin
Galea, Andy
Galios, Chris
Galios, Kathy
Gallagher, Steve
Garcia, Jose
Garcia, Lisa
Gardner, Paul
Garner, Ralph
Gaumont, Ron
Geary, Heide
Geer, Brian
Geiger, Rich
Gergurich, Judy
Giambrone, Jim
Giorgianni, Joe
Giuliodibari, Camille
Goates, Ron
Goings, Mark
Gomes, Rod
Gonzales, Gil
Gonzales, Jesse
Gonzalez, D. (formerly D. Avila)
Gonzalez, Frank
Gonzalez, Jorge
Gott, Pat
Graham, George
Grande, Carm
Grant, Bob
Grant, Doug
Grant, Rich
Granum, Jeff
Graves, Pete
Green, Chris
Grigg, Bruce
Griggs, Fran
Grimes, Eric
Guarascio, Dan
Guerin, Pete
Guido, Jr., Jim
Guido, Sr. Jim
Guizar, Ruben
Gummow, Bob
Gummow, Rich
Gutierrez, Hector
Guzman, Dennis
Guzman, Kim
Gwillim, Reese
Habina, Ron
Hafley, Gary
Hahn, Chuck
Hale, Don
Handforth, Terry
Hann, George
Hare, Caren (Carlisle)
Harnish, Mary (Craven)
Harpainter, Bob
Harris, Bucky
Harris, Diane
Harris, Don
Haskell, Marty
Hawkes, Ken
Haynes, Sandy
Hazen, Skip
Heck, Steve
Heckel, Rick
Hedgpeth, Bob
Helder, Ron
Hellman, Marilyn
Hendrickson, Dave
Hendrix, Dave
Hernandez, Ernie
Hernandez, Irma
Hernandez, Joe
Hernandez, Linda
Hernandez, Rudy
Hernandez, Vic
Herrick, Mike
Herrmann, Erma
Hewison, Jamie
Hewitt, Dave
Hilborn, Art
Hildebrandt, Karen
Hill, Sandra
Hippeli, Micki
Hirata, Gary
Dave Hober
Hober, Margo
Hodgin, Bruce
Hoehn, Charlie
Hogate, Joanne
Hogate, Steve
Hollars, Bob
Holliday, Sandy
Hollingsworth, Larry
Holloway, Sandi
Holser, George
Hong, Bich-nga
Horton, Debbie (McIntyre)
Hosmer, Dewey
Howard, Terri
Howell, Jim
Howsmon, Frank
Howsmon (Sr.), Frank
Hudson, Kim
Hughes, Gary
Hunter, Jeff
Husa, Sonia
Hyland, Brian
Ibarra, Miguel
Imobersteg, Rob
Inami, Steve & Francine
Ingraham, George
Ireland, Joe
Jackson, Curt
Jacksteit, Ken
Jacobson, Barbara
Janavice, Dean
Jeffers, Jim
Jenkins, Dave
Jensen, Dan
Jensen, Janie
Jewett, Donna
Jezo, Pat
Johnson, Bob
Johnson, Craig
Johnson, Cynthia
Johnson, Dave
Johnson, Gary
Johnson, Jon
Johnson, Karen
Johnson, Kyle
Johnson, Mardy
Johnson, Tom & Fran
Jones, Russ
Kaminsky, Glenn
Katashima, Annie
Katz, Dan
Keeney, Bill
Kelsey, Bert
Keneller, Dave
Kennedy, Scott
Kennedy, Tom
Kensit, John
Killen, Pat
Kimbrel, Tammy
Kinaga, Rose
King, Charlie
Kingsley, Fred
Kirkendall, Dave
Kischmischian, Gene
Klein, Lou Anna
Kleman, Karl
Knea, Tim
Kneis, Brian
Knopf, Art
Knopf, Dave
Kocina, Ken
Koenig, Heinz
Kong, Ernie
Kosovilka, Bob
Kozlowski, Astrid
Kracht, John
Kregel, John
Lanctot, Noel
Laney, Tammy
Lansdowne, Sharon
Lara, Bill
LaRault, Gary
Larsen, Bill
Laverty, Ann
Lax, John
Leavy, Bill
Leavey, Jack
LeGault, Anna
LeGault, Russ
Lem, Noland
Leonard, Gary
Leonard (Lintern), Lynda
Leong, Ken
Lewis, Lefty
Lewis, Marv
Lewis, Steve
Lind, Eric
Linden, Larry  
Lisius, Jim
Little, Keith            
Livingstone, John
Lobach, Bob
Lockwood, Bob
Lockwood, Joan
Logan, Maureen
Long (Huntwork), Eunice
Longaker, Mary
Longoria, Noe
Lopez, Candy
Lopez. Dan
Lopez, Ruvi
Lovecchio, Pete
Low, John
Lu, Elba
Luca, Dennis
Lucarotti, Jim
Luna, Gloria
Lundberg, Larry
Lyons, TB
MacDougall, Joanne
Macris, Carly
Macris, Tom
Madison, Gary
Maehler, Mike
Mahan, Rick
Malatesta, Jim
Malcolm, Roger
Mallett, Bill
Malvini, Phil
Mamone, Joe
Marcotte, Steve
Marfia, John
Marfia, Ted
Marin, Julie
Marini, Ed
Marlo, Jack
Marsh, Scott
Martin, Brad
Martin, Lou
Martin, Todd
Martinelli, Ron
Martinez, Rick
Martinez, Victor
Matteoni, Charlotte
Mattern, John
Mattos, Bill
Mattos, Paula
Mattocks, Mike
Mayo, Lorraine
Mayo, Toni
Mazzone, Tom
McCaffrey, Mike
McCain, Norm
McCall, George
McCall, Lani
McCarville, John
McCollum, Bob
McCollum, Daniele
McCready, Tom
McCulloch, Al
McCulloch, Scott
McElvy, Mike
McFall, Ron
McFall, Tom
McGuffin, Rich
McGuire, Pat
McIninch, Mark
McKean, Bob
McKenzie, Dennis
McLucas, Mike
McMahon, Jim
McMahon, Ray
McNamara, Laurie
McTeague, Dan
Meheula, Cheryl
Mendez, Deborah
Mendez, Mike
Messier, Tom
Metcalfe, Dave
Metcalfe, Mickey
Miceli, Sharon
Miller, Keith
Miller, Laura
Miller, Rollie
Miller, Shirley
Miller, Stan
Mills, Don
Mindermann, John
Miranda, Carlos
Mitchell, Carol
Modlin, Dick
Mogilefsky, Art
Moir, Bob
Montano, Wil
Montes, José
Morales, Octavio
Moore, Dewey
Don Moore
Moore, Jeff
Moore, JoAnn
Moorman, Jim
Morella, Ted
Moreno, Norma
Morgan, Dale
Morin, Jim
Morris, Jack
Morton, Bruce
Mosley, Joe
Mosunic, Taffy
Moudakas, Terry
Moura, Don
Mozley, Ron
Muldrow, Mark "Mo"
Mulholland, Kathy
Mullins, Harry
Mulloy, Dennis
Munks, Jeff
Munoz, Art
Murphy, Bob
Musser, Marilynn
Nagel, Michael
Nagengast, Carol
Nakai, Linda
Nalett, Bob
Namba, Bob
Nichols, John
Nichols, Mike
Nimitz, Stephanie
Nissila, Judy
Norling, Debbie
North, Dave
North, Jim
Norton, Phil
Nunes, John
Nunes, Les
O'Carroll, Diane (Azzarello)
O'Connor, Mike
O'Donnell, Tom
O'Keefe, Jim
Oliver, Pete
Ortega, Dan
Ortiz, Leanard
Otter, Larry
Ouimet, Jeff
Ozuna, George
Pacheco, Russ
Padilla, George
Pagan, Irma
Painchaud, Dave
Palsgrove, Ted
Panighetti, Paul
Papenfuhs, Steve
Paredes, Carlos
Parker, Rand
Parlee, May
Parrott, Aubrey
Parsons, Dirk
Parsons, Mike
Pascoe, Brent
Passeau, Chris
Pate, Neal
Patrino, Lyn
Payton, George
Pearce, Jim
Pearson, Sam
Pedroza, Frank
Peeler, Eleanor
Pegram, Larry
Percelle, Ralph
Percival, John
Perry (Cervantez), Martha
Petersen, Bruce
Peterson, Bob
Phelan, Bill
Phelps, Scott
Phillips, Gene
Pitts, Phil
Plinski, Leo
Pointer, John
Polanco, Mary
Polmanteer, Jim
Porter, John
Postier, Ken
Postier, Steve
Powers, Bill
Priddy, Loren
Princevalle, Roger
Propst, Anamarie
Puckett, Bill
Punneo, Norm
Purser, Owen
Pyle, Leroy
Quayle, John
Quezada, Louis
Quinn, John
Quint, Karen
Ramirez, Manny
Ramirez, Victoria
Ramon, Chacha
Raposa, Rick
Rappe (Ryman), Bonnie
Rasmussen, Charlene
Raul, Gary
Raye, Bruce
Realyvasquez, Armando
Reed, Nancy
Reek, Rob
Reeves, Curt
Reid, Fred
Reinhardt, Stephanie
Reizner, Dick
Rendler, Will
Rettus, Bev
Reuter, Larry
Reutlinger, Leslie
Reyes (Buell), Cindy
Reyes, Joe
Reyes, Juan
Reyes, Mo
Rheinhardt, Bob
Rice, Jayme
Rice, Lyle
Richter, Darrell & Annette
Riedel, Gunther
Rimple, Randy
Roach, Jim
Roberts, Mike
Robertson, Harry
Robinson, Walt
Robison, Rob
Rodgers, Phil
Rogers, Lorrie
Romano, Marie
Rose, John
Rose, Wendell
Ross, Joe
Ross, Mike
Rosso, Ron
Roy, Charlie
Royal, Russ
Ruiloba, Louie
Russell, Russ
Russell, Stan
Russo, Grace
Ryan, Joe
Saito, RIch
Salamida Joe
Salewsky, Bill
Salguero, Desiree
Salvi, Pete
Samsel, Dave
Santos, Bill
Sanfilippo, Roy
Sauao, Dennis
Savage, Scott
Savala, john
Sawyer, Craig
Scanlan, Pete
Scannell, Dave
Schembri, Mike
Schenck, Joe
Schenini (Alvarez), Joanne
Schiller, Robert
Schmidt, Chuck
Schmidt, Paul
Schriefer, Hank
Seaman, Scott
Seck, Tom
Sekany, Greg
Seymour, Chuck
Seymour, Jim
Sharps, Betty
Shaver, John
Sheppard, Jeff
Sherman, Gordon
Sherr, Laurie
Shigemasa, Tom
Shuey, Craig
Shuman, John
Sides, Roger
Sills, Eric
Silva, Bill
Silveria, Linda
Silvers, Jim
Simpson, Terry
Sinclair, Bob
Sly, Sandi
Smith, Bill
Smith, BT
Smith, Craig
Smith, Ed
Smith, Jerry
Smith, Karen
Smith, Kerry
Smith, Mike
Smoke, Wil
Sorahan, Dennis
Spangenberg, Hal
Spence, Jim
Spitze, Randy
Spoulos, Dave
Springer, George
Stauffer, Suzan
Stelzer, Rex
Sterner, Mike
Strickland, John
Sturdivant, Billy
Sugimoto, Rich
Suits, Jim
Summers, Bob
Sun, Jeff
Suske, Joe
Swanson, Ray
Tarricone, Linda
Tate, Bill
Taves, Phil & Paula
Taylor, Joyce
Tenbrink, Bob
Tennant, Ed
Teren-Foster, Aileen
Terry, Glenn & Maggie
Thawley, Dave
Thomassin, Ron
Thomas, Art
Thomas, Dick
Thompson, Gary
Thompson, Margie
Thompson, Mike
Tibaldi, Ernie
Tibbet, Walt
Tice, Stan
Tietgens, Dick
Tietgens, Don
Tomaino, Jim
Torres, Gil
Torres, John
Torres, Nestor
Torres, Ralph
Townsend, John
Townsend, Vicki
Tozer, Dave
Trevino, Andy
Trujillo, Ted
Trussler, Christine
Trussler, John
Tush, Dick
Tyler, Diana
Unland, Jim
Unland, Joe
Urban, Diane
Usoz, Steve
Valcazar, Dan
Vallecilla, Ernie & Peggy
Van Dyck, Lois
Vanek, John
Vasquez, Danny
Rich Vasquez
Vasquez, Ted
Vasta, Joe
Videan, Ed
Videan, Theresa
Vidmar, Mike
Vincent, Bill
Vinson, Jim
Vizzusi, Gilbert
Vizzusi, Rich
Vizzusi, Tony
Waggoner, Bill
Wagner, Jim
Wagstaff, Greg
Wahl, John
Walker, Dave
Wall, Chuck
Ward, Jean
Ward, Ray
Watts, Bob
Way, Vicky
Webster, Ron
Wedlow, Dean
Weesner, Greg
Weesner, Steve
Weir, Tony
Welker, Jessica
Wells, Bill
Wells, Brenda
Wells, Mike
Wendling, Boni
Wendling, Jay
Weston, Tom
Wheatley, Tom
White, Rich
Wicker, Joe
Wiley, Bruce
Williams, Jodi
Williams [Durham], Lanette
Williams, Rick
Williamson, Kathleen
Williamson, Ken
Wilson, Caven
Wilson, Jeff
Wilson, Lee
Wilson, Neal
Wilson, Stan
Wilson, Tom
Windisch Jr., Steve
Wininger, Steve
Winter, Bill
Wirht, Kim
Witmer, Dave
Wittenberg, Jim
Wolfe, Jeff
Woo, Paul
Wood, Dave
Wood, Jim
Woodington, Brad
Wysuph, Dave
Yarbrough, Bill
Young, Mike
Younis, Tuck
Yuhas, Dick
Yules, Ken
Zanoni, Mike
Zaragoza, Phil
Zenahlik, Tom
Zimmerman, Eliza
Zwemke, Doug